View a developmental anomaly category

Developmental anomaly categoryinformation for Tumor

Description: (empty)


Developmental anomalies associated with this developmental anomaly category :

Array
(
    [Dacategory] => Array
        (
            [id] => 26
            [name] => Tumor
            [description] => 
        )

    [Thesaurus] => Array
        (
            [0] => Array
                (
                    [id] => 267
                    [name] => Teratoma, cerebral
                    [description] =>  Cerebral teratomas which occur intraaxially in the cerebral hemispheres are typically large teratomas.
                    [author_id] => 1
                    [topo_code] => 46
                    [category_code] => 26
                    [system_code] => 50
                    [parent_da_code] => 877
                    [adicap_ref] => 
                    [humpath_ref] => 
                    [omim_ref] => 
                    [possum_ref] => 
                    [snomed_ref] => 
                    [ICD10_ref] => 
                    [orphanet_ref] => 
                    [emedicine_ref] => 
                    [diseasesdb_ref] => 
                    [mesh_ref] => 
                    [fetusnet_ref] => 
                    [wiki_ref] => 
                    [created] => 2008-05-23 02:00:00
                    [modified] => 2009-01-06 16:03:35
                    [modified_by] => 2
                    [test] => 0
                    [isFree] => 0
                )

            [1] => Array
                (
                    [id] => 497
                    [name] => Teratoma
                    [description] => Teratomas are embryonal neoplasms derived from pluripotent cells containing tissue from at least two of three germ layers (ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm).
 A significant degree of confusion has arisen regarding nomenclature for the various subtypes of teratomas. The word itself is derived from the Greek word teraton, meaning monster, and was used initially by Virchow in the first edition of his book on tumors, which was published in 1863. Teratomas range from benign, well-differentiated (mature) cystic lesions to those that are solid and malignant (immature). Additionally, teratomas may be monodermal and highly specialized, and, rarely within some mature teratomas, certain elements (most commonly squamous components) may undergo malignant transformation.

                    [author_id] => 2
                    [topo_code] => 1
                    [category_code] => 26
                    [system_code] => 1
                    [parent_da_code] => 0
                    [adicap_ref] => 
                    [humpath_ref] => 5989
                    [omim_ref] => 
                    [possum_ref] => 
                    [snomed_ref] => 
                    [ICD10_ref] => 
                    [orphanet_ref] => 
                    [emedicine_ref] => 
                    [diseasesdb_ref] => 
                    [mesh_ref] => 
                    [fetusnet_ref] => 
                    [wiki_ref] => 
                    [created] => 2008-08-06 15:41:33
                    [modified] => 2009-01-06 16:01:23
                    [modified_by] => 3
                    [test] => 0
                    [isFree] => 0
                )

            [2] => Array
                (
                    [id] => 624
                    [name] => Dermoid cyst of the ovary
                    [description] => Dermoid cyst is a teratoma, usually benign, characterized by mature ectodermal elements, having a fibrous wall lined with stratified epithelium, and containing keratinous material, hair, and sometimes material such as bone, tooth, or nerve tissue; found most often in the ovary.
Both dermoid and teratoma, terms now more than a century old, remain in general use and often are used interchangeably. The earliest implications were that dermoids were predominantly composed of elements similar to skin and its appendages, while teratomas had no such limits. Dermoids now are recognized as often being trigeminal and containing practically any type of tissue.

For those who continue to make a distinction, dermoids are tumors that maintain rather orderly arrangements, with well-differentiated ectodermal and mesodermal tissues surrounding endodermal components. Teratomas, specifically solid teratomas, essentially are devoid of organization; thus, the presence of some degree of organization, a high degree of cellular differentiation, and cystic structure differentiates dermoids from teratomas. .

                    [author_id] => 3
                    [topo_code] => 79
                    [category_code] => 26
                    [system_code] => 39
                    [parent_da_code] => 0
                    [adicap_ref] => 
                    [humpath_ref] => 
                    [omim_ref] => 
                    [possum_ref] => 
                    [snomed_ref] => 
                    [ICD10_ref] => 
                    [orphanet_ref] => 
                    [emedicine_ref] => 
                    [diseasesdb_ref] => 
                    [mesh_ref] => 
                    [fetusnet_ref] => 
                    [wiki_ref] => 
                    [created] => 2008-08-26 19:15:31
                    [modified] => 2008-12-12 16:43:13
                    [modified_by] => 3
                    [test] => 0
                    [isFree] => 0
                )

            [3] => Array
                (
                    [id] => 877
                    [name] => Teratoma, intracranial
                    [description] => Intracranial teratomas can be divided into two broad categories: those that occur intraaxially in the cerebral hemispheres, are typically large, and are usually found in the newborn period, and those that manifest later, are more likely to be in the pineal region, and are usually smaller.
                    [author_id] => 3
                    [topo_code] => 46
                    [category_code] => 26
                    [system_code] => 50
                    [parent_da_code] => 497
                    [adicap_ref] => 
                    [humpath_ref] => 14683
                    [omim_ref] => 
                    [possum_ref] => 
                    [snomed_ref] => 
                    [ICD10_ref] => 
                    [orphanet_ref] => 
                    [emedicine_ref] => 
                    [diseasesdb_ref] => 
                    [mesh_ref] => 
                    [fetusnet_ref] => 
                    [wiki_ref] => 
                    [created] => 2009-01-02 21:44:00
                    [modified] => 2009-01-06 16:06:11
                    [modified_by] => 2
                    [test] => 0
                    [isFree] => 0
                )

        )

)